In-School Programs

Playshops in Performance


Suggested for grades 3-12

We call them ‘Playshops’ because they feel much more like play than work! Students will gain new insights into Shakespeare’s relevance while experiencing the power of his language when they get out of their seats and on their feet, exploring Shakespeare’s text with trained teaching artists who also make up our professional acting company. Our Playshop in Performance is the #1 most requested program we offer--often in combination with student matinee attendance--and is the best way to introduce the ‘play’ behind the play.

Learn more about Playshops in Performance

ASC’s teaching artists visit your school and divide as many as 50 students into teams. Students work closely with an artist in small groups to unleash an exciting and immediate experience of Shakespeare’s language, which they quickly make their own through the acting process. Student’s ideas and interpretations are incorporated and woven into a final scene sharing to create a class ‘production’ of the play.

In our Playshops, each student can succeed. Students at all levels of reading comprehension and language skills can fully participate. Any Shakespeare play is available as a Playshop. The cost for any of our playshops is $7/ student with a small additional fee assessed if we have to travel more than a 50 mile radius from our location on Peachtree Street.

Playshop titles include (but are not limited to!) Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Taming of the Shrew, Twelfth Night and The Tempest.

If we do not have a playhop on the Shakespearean title that you are teaching, we can create one for you for a small administrative fee.

To book a Playshop in Performance, please contact
Kati Grace Brown for Grades 6-8 at
Andrew Houchins for Grades 9-12 at


Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Playshops in Performance
Third Grade ELAGSE3RL1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

ELAGSE3RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases both literal and nonliteral language as they are used in the text.

Fourth Grade ELAGSE4RL2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

ELAGSE4RL3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

ELAGSE4RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

Fifth Grade ELAGSE5RL2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

ELAGSE5RL3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

ELAGSE5RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

Sixth Grade ELAGSE6RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

ELAGSE6RL5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot

Seventh Grade ELAGSE7RL3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how settings shape the characters or plot).

ELAGSE7RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

ELAGSE7RL5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Eighth Grade ELAGSE8RL3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

ELAGSE8RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELAGSE8RL7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

Ninth-Tenth Grade ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Eleventh-Twelfth Grade

ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

ELAGSE11-12RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.)

Shakespeare Says!


Suggested for grades K-2

This exciting and highly interactive event introduces the language and style of Shakespeare’s plays to your elementary school students using dance, stage combat and the art of storytelling. The workshop encourages creative play, cooperation and successful participation for all kids.
Learn More About Shakespeare Says!

Through a gateway of fun theater warm-ups, games, movement and interactive storytelling, your students will encounter the wonderful language and outrageous situations using some of Shakespeare’s most famous comedies. This Playshop encourages creative play, cooperation and successful participation for all kids. Using multiple innovative approaches, we strive to enable every child, no matter his/her learning style, to enjoy success in helping create the story. Teaching artists from our professional company explore with students the many imaginative possibilities within Shakespeare’s language and encourages spontaneous discovery as part of the storytelling process.

Choose from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew, Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth, A Winter’s Tale, Much Ado About Nothing or The Merry Wives of Windsor for your Shakespeare Says! experience.

Prefer a different Shakespeare title than our current offerings? Just let us know (with at least one month's notice please!) and we can create a Shakespeare Says! script for any of Shakespeare's plays just for you for an additional $25 fee.

The cost for Shakespeare Says! is $7/ student with a small additional fee assessed if we have to travel more than a 50 mile radius from our home on Peachtree Street. To book Shakespeare Says! please contact Adam King at .

Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Shakespeare Says!
Kindergarten ELAGSEKRL3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

ELAGSEKRL4 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

ELAGSEKSL2 Confirm understanding of written texts read aloud or information presented orally or through media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.

First Grade ELAGSE1RL3 Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

ELAGSE1RL4 Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

ELAGSE1RL9 Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

ELAGSE1RI4 Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.

Second Grade ELAGSE2RL1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

ELAGSE2RL3 Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

ELAGSE2RL4 Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

ELAGSE2SL3 Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.


Playing Shakespeare Funny


Suggested for grades 9-12

Designed for older students who have had some exposure to dramatic literature or acting, this Playshop explores some of Shakespeare’s popular comedies (Much Ado about Nothing, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It or The Taming of the Shrew) for all types of funny. We’ll discuss rhetoric and comedy ‘rules’ that can be followed or broken to great comedic (and dramatic) effect.

Learn more about Playing Shakespeare Funny

Your students will learn to investigate Shakespeare’s language for comedic and dramatic acting clues and techniques for winning an argument, while creating their own ‘funny’ as they go!

  • Why Shakespeare appreciated the creative art of the outrageous insult.
  • Contrapuntal argument—what happens when we use the energy of a silly argument to energize Shakespeare’s language?
  • What is rhetoric? Figures of Speech? How does Shakespeare use it in his comedies?

Comedy is not just following rules but breaking them!

Cost is $7/ student with a small additional fee assessed if we have to travel more than a 50 mile radius from our home on Peachtree Street.

To book this workshop please contact Andrew Houchins at or call 404-874-5299 ext. 57.


Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Playing Shakespeare Funny
Ninth-Tenth Grade ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Eleventh-Twelfth Grade ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

ELAGSE11-12RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.


Design Your Own Shakespeare Classroom!


Nothing helps students forge personal connections to Shakespeare’s poetry quite so well as the chance to explore his words on stage. If you would like to provide your students a deeper experience with Shakespearean drama than a 1-hour Playshop might afford, we can help. Our customizable Shakespeare Performance Residency program can meet your classroom needs and budget.

Learn more about designing your Shakespeare classroom

Our Shakespeare Performance Residencies come in all shapes and sizes, but every Residency allows your students to explore Shakespeare’s text and the dramatic arts through individualized instruction from actors/trained teaching artists. Most teachers and schools request that a Residency culminate in a final performance, but the program goals are entirely up to you!

Our teaching artists work with you to design Residencies. Some recent examples include:
  • 1 class period per week for 10 weeks, with mini-scene and monologue performance for the school.
  • An intensive 2-week Shakespeare elective academic course during special ‘winter term’ semester.
  • A focused Shakespeare curriculum with in-class time 2 or 3 days per week throughout the semester and a final performance for family and students.
  • The ‘Renaissance Youth Residency’: an intensive 8-week Residency model with up to 50 students meeting each day after school to rehearse and receive training in Shakespearean text, stage combat, madrigal singing and more. This model finishes with students performing a costumed Shakespeare play both in school and on our professional stage. Click here for more information about our Renaissance Youth Residency.

For more information or to schedule a residency, please contact Educational Programs Producer, Kati Grace Brown at


Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Design Your Own Shakespeare Classroom
Third Grade ELAGSE3RL1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

ELAGSE3RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases both literal and nonliteral language as they are used in the text.

Fourth Grade ELAGSE4RL2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

ELAGSE4RL3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

ELAGSE4RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

Fifth Grade ELAGSE5RL2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

ELAGSE5RL3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

ELAGSE5RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

Sixth Grade ELAGSE6RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

ELAGSE6RL5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot

Seventh Grade ELAGSE7RL3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how settings shape the characters or plot).

ELAGSE7RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

ELAGSE7RL5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Eighth Grade ELAGSE8RL3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

ELAGSE8RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELAGSE8RL7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

Ninth-Tenth Grade
ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Eleventh-Twelfth Grade
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

ELAGSE11-12RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.)


What are some previous examples of your in-school residencies? Click on each title to read a description! Don’t see a title that you & your students are interested in exploring? Never fear! Our professional teaching artists can create a “Design Your Own Shakespeare Classroom” program on any of Shakespeare’s works just for you!

Show examples of in-school residencies
  • Twelve Little Plantagenets
    Middle/ High School

    An exciting, Agatha Christie-style take on Richard III will have you asking "Whodunit?!" Watch out for those poisoned strawberries! Shakespeare's text is re-imagined in a comedic take on this classic historical tragedy.

    The Students will study Shakespearean text, movement, and introductory stage combat through games-based learning. The residency will culminate in a final mini-performance of Richard III directed by our professional actors & teaching artists. The final performance will feature representative costume pieces designed by the students.

  • CSI: Romeo and Juliet
    Middle/ High School

    Crime: Paris, Romeo & Juliet have been found dead in the Capulets’ tomb.
    Detective: Prince Escalus
    Witnesses: Balthasar, Paris’s Page, Friar
    Suspects: Balthasar, Paris’s Page, Friar, Lord & Lady Capulet, Lord Montague, Nurse

    The Script: Arranged as a flashback, we begin this version of Romeo and Juliet with the discovery of the star-crossed lovers in the tomb. As the Friar performs his “confession” speech, the cast enacts many of the most iconic scenes from the original text.

    The Students will study Shakespearean text, Elizabethan dance, and introductory stage combat through games-based learning culminating in a final mini-performance of Romeo & Juliet directed by our professional actors & teaching artists. The final performance will feature representative costume pieces designed by the students.

  • A Hamlet Whodunnit
    High School

    Crime: King Hamlet of Denmark is dead.
    Detective: Hamlet
    Suspects: Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, and Laertes

    The Students will study Shakespearean text, clowning & movement through games-based learning culminating in a final mini-performance of Hamlet directed by our professional actors & teaching artists. The final performance will feature representative costume pieces designed by the students.

For more information or to schedule a residency, please contact Educational Programs Coordinator, Kati Grace Brown at




Playshops for Non-Shakespeare Curriculums
Suggested for Grades 6-12
  • Costume Design & Construction
  • Stage Makeup & Special Effects
  • Stage Combat

And those are just a few examples! For more information about these Playshops, contact Kati Grace Brown at .



Play On! Theater Games to Build a Classroom


Suggested for Grades K-12

ASC is thrilled to offer this new interactive workshop specifically tailored to your students. Play On! incorporates dramatic arts within the curriculum, harnessing the power and excitement of live theatre and the idea of ‘play’ to teach your students valuable classroom skills. Written through collaborating expertise of teaching artists and classroom teachers, this workshop offers games and exercises appropriate for any age group.

Learn more about our Play On! Playshop

Learn along with your class as our trained teaching artists hone your students’ classroom skills and give you the vocabulary and activities to continue this learning once we’re finished! We can help you and your students add multiple intelligences learning to any subject, and specifically target the following behavioral skills to meet your classroom’s needs:

  • Setting goals, and using tactics to overcome obstacles and achieve them.
  • Listening Before Reacting
  • Team Work
  • Trusting Their Instincts
  • Observation
  • Focus
  • Following Directions
  • Setting Goals and Achieving Them!
  • Engaging The Imagination
  • Following Cues
  • Classroom Status

  • The cost for Play On! is $7/ student with a small additional fee assessed if we have to travel more than a 50 mile radius from our location on Peachtree Street. For more information or to book Play On! for your classroom, please contact Kati Grace Brown at


Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Play On!
Kindergarten ELAGSEKSL3 Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.

First Grade ELAGSE1SL3 Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.

Second Grade ELAGSE2SL3 Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.

Third Grade ELAGSE3SL3 Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

Fourth Grade ELAGSE4SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Fifth Grade ELAGSE5SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Sixth Grade ELAGSE6SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Seventh Grade ELAGSE7SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Eighth Grade ELAGSE8SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Ninth-Tenth Grade ELAGSE9-10L4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Eleventh-Twelfth Grade ELAGSE11-12SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.


Literacy Through Drama Workshops


Suggested for Grades 6-12

Designed for classrooms studying American Classics, non-Shakespeare British Literature or any type of dramatic literature, this interactive workshop allows students to explore the selected play through mutiple points of views- as audience members, actors and playwrights.

Learn more about our Literacy Through Drama Workshops

Our professional actors and teaching artists will perform a brief selection of scenes from the show, direct selected students in performing a scripted scene from the play, instruct the students on an assortment of literary devices and prompt and empower the students to write and perform their own short scripts- all within one class period!

The 2016-17 offerings of play titles for this workshop are as follows:


  • Our Town
  • The Crucible
  • A Christmas Carol
  • Greek Mythology
  • Dr. Faustus
  • The Canterbury Tales

Cost is $7/ student with a small additional fee assessed if we have to travel more than a 50 mile radius from our home on Peachtree Street.

To book this workshop please contact Kati Grace Brown at or call 404-874-5299 ext. 42.


Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Literacy Through Drama
Sixth Grade ELAGSE6RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

ELAGSE6RL5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

Seventh Grade ELAGSE7RL3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how settings shape the characters or plot).

ELAGSE7RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

ELAGSE7RL5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Eighth Grade ELAGSE8RL3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

ELAGSE8RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

ELAGSE8RL7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

Ninth-Tenth Grade ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Eleventh-Twelfth Grade
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

ELAGSE11-12RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.)