Artists-in-Residence

“These are the youths that thunder at a playhouse…” -Henry VIII (5.4.3331)

A residency is an eight-week, language-based exploration of a Shakespeare play culminating in a full production. It focuses on the after-school activities of casting, rehearsing and producing a play by William Shakespeare.


Students in the project can receive training in:
  • Stage combat, stagecraft, warm-up techniques
  • Acting, dance and voice work, and stage movement
  • Costume, makeup, lighting, and props/set design and construction
  • Backstage management, publicity and program/poster design
  • Dramaturgy, scholarship and research skills

Master Classes are available in:
  • Stage combat
  • Elizabethan dance
  • Shakespeare’s text in performance
  • Stage management, stage craft and design
  • Sound sculpture/effects, music and additional skills
  • Master classes can be opened to anyone in the school community, including parents, as well as the cast and crew of the show. The director of the production and trained Teaching Artists / professional ASC actors and directors teach these classes.

Keystones of the Residency are:
  • Inclusiveness and participation for everyone
  • Creativity and a high level of polish in performance
  • A commitment to the over-all scholarship required when producing and performing Shakespeare.

Participation in the Residency will build:
  • Team work and time management skills
  • A sense of commitment and passion for a greater, creative good
  • Greater clarity and confidence in self-expression.
  • Enhanced empathetic listening skills.
  • Self-esteem and life-skills that can lead to future success in college and the greater world.

  • For more information or to schedule an artist-in-residence program, please contact Educational Programs Producer, Kati Grace Brown:


    Design Your Own Shakespeare Classroom!


    Nothing helps students forge personal connections to Shakespeare’s poetry quite so well as the chance to explore his words on stage. If you would like to provide your students a deeper experience with Shakespearean drama than a 1-hour Playshop might afford, we can help. Our customizable Shakespeare Performance Residency program can meet your classroom needs and budget.

    Learn more about designing your Shakespeare classroom

    Our Shakespeare Performance Residencies come in all shapes and sizes, but every Residency allows your students to explore Shakespeare’s text and the dramatic arts through individualized instruction from actors/trained teaching artists. Most teachers and schools request that a Residency culminate in a final performance, but the program goals are entirely up to you!

    Our teaching artists work with you to design Residencies. Some recent examples include:
    • 1 class period per week for 10 weeks, with mini-scene and monologue performance for the school.
    • An intensive 2-week Shakespeare elective academic course during special ‘winter term’ semester.
    • A focused Shakespeare curriculum with in-class time 2 or 3 days per week throughout the semester and a final performance for family and students.
    • The ‘Renaissance Youth Residency’: an intensive 8-week Residency model with up to 50 students meeting each day after school to rehearse and receive training in Shakespearean text, stage combat, madrigal singing and more. This model finishes with students performing a costumed Shakespeare play both in school and on our professional stage. Click here for more information about our Renaissance Youth Residency.

    For more information or to schedule a residency, please contact Educational Programs Producer, Kati Grace Brown at


    Click here to see the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Design Your Own Shakespeare Classroom
    Third Grade ELAGSE3RL1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

    ELAGSE3RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases both literal and nonliteral language as they are used in the text.

    Fourth Grade ELAGSE4RL2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

    ELAGSE4RL3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

    ELAGSE4RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

    Fifth Grade ELAGSE5RL2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

    ELAGSE5RL3 Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

    ELAGSE5RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

    Sixth Grade ELAGSE6RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

    ELAGSE6RL5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot

    Seventh Grade ELAGSE7RL3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how settings shape the characters or plot).

    ELAGSE7RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

    ELAGSE7RL5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

    Eighth Grade ELAGSE8RL3 Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

    ELAGSE8RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

    ELAGSE8RL7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

    Ninth-Tenth Grade
    ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

    ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

    ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

    ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

    ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

    Eleventh-Twelfth Grade
    ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

    ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    ELAGSE11-12RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

    ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.)


    What are some previous examples of your in-school residencies? Click on each title to read a description! Don’t see a title that you & your students are interested in exploring? Never fear! Our professional teaching artists can create a “Design Your Own Shakespeare Classroom” program on any of Shakespeare’s works just for you!

    Show examples of in-school residencies
    • Twelve Little Plantagenets
      Middle/ High School

      An exciting, Agatha Christie-style take on Richard III will have you asking "Whodunit?!" Watch out for those poisoned strawberries! Shakespeare's text is re-imagined in a comedic take on this classic historical tragedy.

      The Students will study Shakespearean text, movement, and introductory stage combat through games-based learning. The residency will culminate in a final mini-performance of Richard III directed by our professional actors & teaching artists. The final performance will feature representative costume pieces designed by the students.

    • CSI: Romeo and Juliet
      Middle/ High School

      Crime: Paris, Romeo & Juliet have been found dead in the Capulets’ tomb.
      Detective: Prince Escalus
      Witnesses: Balthasar, Paris’s Page, Friar
      Suspects: Balthasar, Paris’s Page, Friar, Lord & Lady Capulet, Lord Montague, Nurse

      The Script: Arranged as a flashback, we begin this version of Romeo and Juliet with the discovery of the star-crossed lovers in the tomb. As the Friar performs his “confession” speech, the cast enacts many of the most iconic scenes from the original text.

      The Students will study Shakespearean text, Elizabethan dance, and introductory stage combat through games-based learning culminating in a final mini-performance of Romeo & Juliet directed by our professional actors & teaching artists. The final performance will feature representative costume pieces designed by the students.

    • A Hamlet Whodunnit
      High School

      Crime: King Hamlet of Denmark is dead.
      Detective: Hamlet
      Suspects: Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, and Laertes

      The Students will study Shakespearean text, clowning & movement through games-based learning culminating in a final mini-performance of Hamlet directed by our professional actors & teaching artists. The final performance will feature representative costume pieces designed by the students.

    For more information or to schedule a residency, please contact Educational Programs Coordinator, Kati Grace Brown at