Buy Tickets From the 2013-2014 Season: Antony and Cleopatra Playing June 07, 2014 to June 29, 2014

$15 General Admission Previews Thurs June 5 & Friday June 6

The Tavern stage becomes Egypt and Rome to tell this story of a passion so legendary that it ignites battles and jeopardizes kingdoms, ultimately consuming its lovers and the entire ancient world. Even Brad and Angelina can’t top that.

A part of The Shakespeare Evolution Series!

Join the cast and crew members for a lively Question and Answer session on Sunday June 15 after the show!


Read the Plot Synopsis

Antony and Cleopatra

Mark Antony is one of the triumvirs, the three joint rulers of the Roman world. Cleopatra, in her Alexandrian palace, is Queen of Egypt. They are infatuated with each other; but Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome when he hears that Fulvia, his wife, has died, and that Pompey, son of Pompey the Great, has risen against Octavius Caesar.

In Rome, Antony patches up a quarrel by agreeing to marry Caesar’s sister, Octavia; the triumvirs attend a friendly feast in Pompey’s galley. Still, Antony will not relinquish Cleopatra; Caesar will not keep the peace with Pompey. Ultimately Caesar opposes Antony at Actium and in the sea-battle Cleopatra’s squadron flies. Antony is defeated. He wins the first day of land fighting but on a second day the Egyptian fleet surrenders.

After hearing a false report of Cleopatra’s death, and falling on his sword, Antony is borne, mortally wounded, to Cleopatra in her “monument” (or mausoleum). There he dies. Rather than be taken to Rome as a captive, she has herself arrayed in the royal robes and crown of Egypt and dies from the bite of an asp brought to her by a peasant. So she is found with her waiting-women, dead beside her; and Caesar orders, “She shall be buried by her Antony;/No grave upon the earth shall clip in it/A pair so famous.”
-from The Pocket Companion to Shakespeare’s Plays by J.C. Trewin


Director's Notes

Directed by Jeff Watkins

Show Information

Duration

Act One 80 min / Act Two 70 min

Show Roles

Marc Antony – Matt Nitchie
Lepidus – Troy Willis*
Octavius Caesar – Jonathan Horne
Cleopatra – Laura Cole
Charmian – Amee Vyas*
Iras – Rachel Frawley
Octavia – Mary Russell
Enobarbus – Andrew Houchins*
Camidius – Clarke Weigle
Diomedes – Ralph Del Rosario
Pompey – Paul Hester*
Decretas – Paul Hester*
Eros – Doug Graham
Philo – Joshua Diboll
Maecenas – Joshua Diboll
Dolabella – Nicholas Faircloth
Agrippa – Chris Rushing
Mardian – Nicholas Faircloth
Seleucas – Clarke Weigle
Alexas – Drew Reeves*
Scarus – Drew Reeves*
Demetrius – Paul Hester*
Thidias – Paul Hester*
Proculeus – Troy Willis*
Varrius – Mary Russell
Ventidius – Nicholas Faircloth
Soothsayer – Rivka Levin*
Menecrates – Clarke Weigle
Menas – Doug Graham
Clown – Rivka Levin*
Musicians – Clarke Weigle, David Rood, Rivka Levin*

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States

Show Times
Shows at the New American Shakespeare Tavern begin at 7:30pm, except on Sundays, when they begin at 6:30pm

Bardometer Rating

How difficult is this Shakespearean play to grasp? On a scale of 1 to 10.
5
 
What does rating this mean?

These are plays you may have read in high school or college. The plot is fairly uncomplicated, though some of the themes may be dense or dark. These plays may include supernatural elements, straight-forward politics, historical content or religious content. (In these cases, we offer a synopsis with important historical or contextual explanations which you may read in the Playbill before the show.) In these plays, there may also be bawdy language and certain adult situations, and the language may be hard to follow for a first-timer.

We recommend this type of play to High School and College Students, casual theatre-goers, people who like mainstream films and reading “The Onion”, and Shakespeare lovers who enjoy delving into the Elizabethan world.

How to prepare for seeing this kind of play: You may wish to read the synopsis we provide (and maybe your notes from Literature Class). Or simply do a small amount of internet research. No worries – you won’t get lost.

Additional Information