Buy Tickets From the 2012-2013 Season: Julius Caesar (2013) Playing April 04, 2013 to April 28, 2013

$15 General Admission Previews Thurs April 4, & Friday April 5, 2013

Victor Love

Directed by Troy Willis
The Ides of March are come. The Tavern stage becomes ancient Rome in order to tell this unforgettable story of political intrigue, ambition, betrayal, conspiracy and murder. Was Caesar a god, a tyrant or just a man? Can murder ever be honorable? Full of some of the most famous speeches and poetry in the English language, lend us your ears. Experience Julius Caesar.

A part of The Shakespeare Evolution Series!

Join the cast and crew members for a lively Question and Answer session on Sunday April 14 after the show!


Read the Plot Synopsis

Synopsis

-Adapted for this production from The Pocket Companion to Shakespeare’s Plays by
JC Trewin

A powerful faction fears the growing strength of Julius Caesar in republican Rome. As he walks to the festival games, a soothsayer warns him of the Ides of March. On a stormy night, Cassius and Casca visit Marcus Brutus, who must be won to the rebel party. He receives them and other conspirators in his garden, and Caesar’s murder is planned for the next morning. Portia, wife of Brutus, observes his unrest.

Caesar’s wife, Calphurnia, seeks to prevent her husband from going to the Capitol, but he does so, and upon the Ides of March is stabbed to death. Brutus, in the Forum, tells the mob his reasons; then Mark Antony, permitted to speak as Caesar’s friend, rouses the people of Rome in a speech of searching and calculated irony and passion. Antony, Caesar’s great-nephew Octavius and the feeble Lepidus form a triumvirate against the conspirators. Brutus and the firebrand Cassius quarrel in their camp at Sardis; the quarrel is resolved, and Cassius learns that Portia, wife of Brutus, has committed suicide in Rome. The meeting of the armies will be at Philippi; the ghost of Caesar appears to Brutus, saying that he also will be there.

Cassius, believing the final battle to be lost, orders his servants to stab him; Brutus falls on his own sword; and Antony speaks the epitaph over his foe.


Show Information

Duration

Act One - 75 min / Act Two - 60 min

Show Roles

Julius Caesar - Victor Love*
Calphurnia - Laura Cole
Marcus Brutus - Drew Reeves*
Portia - Jennifer Lamourt
Caius Cassius - J.C. Long*
Trebonius - Brian Mayberry
Decius Brutus - Chris Rushing
Metellus Cimber - Jacob York
Cinna - Dani Herd
Caius Ligarius - Garrett Gray
Caska - J. Tony Brown*
Mark Antony - Matt Nitchie
Octavius Caesar - Garrett Gray
Lepidus - Clarke Weigle
Messala - Jacob York
Lucius (boy) - Matt Felten
Strato - Victor Love*
Dardanius - J. Tony Brown*
Murellus, Tribune to the people - Paul Hester*
Cicero a Senator - Clarke Weigle
Young Cato - Paul Hester*
Popillius Lena, a Senator - .Garrett Gray
Soothsayer - Clarke Weigle
Artimedorus - Paul Hester*
Cinna the Poet - Joshua Diboll
Antony’s Servant - Matt Felten
Caesar’s Servant - Charles Umeano
Octavius’ Servant - Charles Umeano
Commoners - Matt Felten, Garrett Gray, Jacob York
Carpenter - Dani Herd
Titinius - Chris Rushing
Pindarus - Joshua Diboll
Flavius - Jacob York
Clitus - Charles Umeano
Lucilius - Brian Mayberry
Publius - Joshua Diboll
Voluminus - Dani Herd
Cobbler - Clarke Weigle
Plebeians - Laura Cole, Matt Felten, Garrett Gray, J. Tony Brown*, Jacob York,
Chris Rushing, Paul Hester*, Joshua Diboll, Dani Herd

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States

Show Times
Shows at the New American Shakespeare Tavern begin at 7:30pm, except on Sundays, when they begin at 6:30pm

Bardometer Rating

How difficult is this Shakespearean play to grasp? On a scale of 1 to 10.
5
 
What does rating this mean?

These are plays you may have read in high school or college. The plot is fairly uncomplicated, though some of the themes may be dense or dark. These plays may include supernatural elements, straight-forward politics, historical content or religious content. (In these cases, we offer a synopsis with important historical or contextual explanations which you may read in the Playbill before the show.) In these plays, there may also be bawdy language and certain adult situations, and the language may be hard to follow for a first-timer.

We recommend this type of play to High School and College Students, casual theatre-goers, people who like mainstream films and reading “The Onion”, and Shakespeare lovers who enjoy delving into the Elizabethan world.

How to prepare for seeing this kind of play: You may wish to read the synopsis we provide (and maybe your notes from Literature Class). Or simply do a small amount of internet research. No worries – you won’t get lost.

Additional Information