Buy Tickets From the 2012-2013 Season: Much Ado About Nothing (2013) Playing March 07, 2013 to March 30, 2013

$15 General Admission Preview Thurs March 7, 2013

(No performance Easter Sunday March 31, 2013)

Erin Considine, Andrew Houchins

Directed by J. Tony Brown
Shakespeare’s second-famous “battle of the sexes” play. Will Benedick, the ever-confirmed bachelor, admit his love for the equally witty and equally independent Beatrice? Will the young lovers Claudio and Hero survive the devious meddling of others? What do you want to bet there will be two weddings in the end?

Join the cast and crew members for a lively Question and Answer session on Sunday March 17 after the show!


Read the Plot Synopsis

Much Ado Synopsis

Leonato, Governor of Messina, is host to Don Pedro, the Prince of Arragon, who has come from suppressing a rebellion by his bastard brother, Don John. With Pedro are John, now “reconciled” to him; Claudio, a young Florentine lord, of whom John is bitterly resentful; and a Paduan lord, Benedick, said to be a confirmed bachelor and engaged in a “merry war” with Leonato’s niece, Beatrice, apparently a confirmed spinster. Claudio loves Leonato’s daughter, Hero; Don John swears to thwart him. After a masked ball the wedding of Claudio and Hero is planned. Borachio, Don John’s follower, tells him that having seen that the Prince and Claudio are listening, he will exchange love vows by night with Hero’s gentlewoman, dressed in her mistress’s clothes, at Hero’s bedroom window.

Pedro, Claudio and Leonato ensure that Benedick (hidden in a garden arbour) hears them discuss Beatrice’s presumably passionate love for him. Hero and Ursula play a similar trick on the listening Beatrice (here the passion is Benedick’s). On the night before the wedding Don John offers to give the Prince and Claudio proof of Hero’s unfaithfulness. Later, Borachio heard boasting about his successful deceit to a drunken comrade, is arrested by the Watch and taken to Dogberry, the constable. Before Leonato can know anything, the wedding ceremony is due. In the church Claudio denounces Hero, who faints. The Prince proposed that Hero who be reported dead and hidden until the truth is known. Beatrice, much grieved, urges Benedick to kill Claudio. At length all is revealed and the penitent Claudio promises to marry a niece of Leonato, said to be the image of the “dead” Hero. She is, of course, Hero herself; Beatrice and Benedick, as expected, resolve their “merry war,” and news comes that Don John has been taken prisoner.

-The Pocket Companion to Shakespeare’s Plays by J C Trewin


Show Information

Duration

Act One - 70 min / Act Two - 80 min

Show Roles

March 7-30, 2013

Don Pedro - Matt Nitchie
Don John - Marcus Durham
Claudio - Jonathan Horne
Benedick - Andrew Houchins*
Leonato - Troy Willis*
Antonio - Emmett Furrow
Borachio - Vinnie Mascola
Conrade - Jeffrey Stephenson
Dogberry - Drew Reeves*
Verges - Clarke Weigle
Sexton - Emmett Furrow
Friar Frances - Daniel Parvis
Hero - Kathryn Lawson
Beatrice - Erin Considine
Margaret - Jennifer Acker
Ursula - Rachel Frawley
The Watch - Marcus Durham, Daniel Parvis, Chris Schulz
Musicians - Mary Ruth Ralston, Drew Reeves*, Chris Schulz, Clarke Weigle
Balthasar - Daniel Parvis

Show Times
Shows at The Shakespeare Tavern Playhouse begin at 7:30pm, except on Sundays, when they begin at 6:30pm

Bardometer Rating

How difficult is this Shakespearean play to grasp? On a scale of 1 to 10.
2
 
What does rating this mean?

You may already know the story and what happens at the end. But even if you don’t, the play is light and the plot is easy to follow. Limited violence, limited bawdiness (see below). There are very few things – historical, religious, or political – that you need to know ahead of time. Just enjoy!

A note about bawdiness in Shakespeare: It exists. Despite what your English teacher taught you, Shakespeare wrote some pretty saucy lines and they pop up from time to time. While there is never any nudity on stage, our actors are trained to make the text clear. If we feel a show contains a plethora of Graphic Elizabethan Poetry (or is very bloody/violent/triggering) we will put that disclaimer in the blurb about the show. It won’t happen often. If this Bardometer lists a play as a 1 or 2, you can rest assured that it is an appropriate show for kids under ten.

Additional Information