Buy Tickets From the 2012-2013 Season: All’s Well that Ends Well & Measure for Measure (in repertory) Playing September 06, 2012 to September 30, 2012

Jaclyn Hofmann, Paul Hester, Jenn Acker, Mary Russell, Matt Nitchie

The September Repertory. Or: What Could POSSIBLY go wrong? Join us as we finish the Shakespeare comedies with the final two:

Measure for Measure
Directed by Artistic Director Jeff Watkins
Performances September 23, 27, 29, 2012

What could possibly go wrong when the Duke of Vienna decides to enforce a few long-ignored morality laws . . .and then “skips town,” leaving his self-righteous deputy in charge to enforce the new moral order? What will the innocent Isabella stoop to in order to save her brother’s life? Written with absorbing strength and eloquence, Shakespeare weaves for you a tale of love, lust, justice and forgiveness that will, naturally, leave you laughing.


All’s Well that Ends Well
Directed by Drew Reeves
Performances September 22, 28, 30, 2012

There is nothing that Helena won’t do to be with the haughty Bertram, who has run away to avoid being with her. By setting her up with seemingly impossible tasks to perform in order to bring him back, he thinks he’s safe from being her husband. What could possibly go wrong? Full of outrageous plot twists and tricks, this comedic tale is sure to surprise and entertain.

Both shows are a part of The Shakespeare Evolution Series!

Join the cast and crew members for a lively Question and Answer session for BOTH PLAYS on Sunday September 16 after the show!


Read the Plot Synopsis

Measure for Measure Synopsis
Vincentio, Duke of Vienna, resolving on the enforcement of the city’s ignored laws against immorality, proclaims his departure to Poland; actually he remains, disguised as a friar, to see what his Deputy, the severe Angelo (whose “blood is very snow-broth”) will do. One of Angelo’s first acts is to imprison Claudio for getting his betrothed, Juliet, with child, an offence that carries the death penalty.

Isabella, Claudio’s sister, a potential novice in a religious order, comes to plead with Angelo and he invites her to return the next day. When she does he tells her that, if she will be his mistress, he will pardon her brother. Horrified, she visits her brother who entreats her to agree. She refuses; but the disguised Duke/Friar suggests that she give way, and that Mariana, once Angelo’s spurned love, take her place at night.

Mariana accepts the plan; Angelo, faithlessly, has ordered Claudio’s death which is prevented by the Duke/Friar and the Provost. The Duke returns as himself. In a complex scene Angelo, after compulsorily wedding Mariana, is pardoned, Claudio will marry Juliet, and the Duke confesses his own love for Isabella.
-The Pocket Companion to Shakespeare’s Plays by J C Trewin

All’s Well Synopsis
Helena, an orphan, loves Bertram, son of the dowager Countess of Rousillon, who has brought her up. When the haughty young man goes as a ward to the French King, Helena – whose father has been a celebrated physician – follows him, hoping that she may cure the King of a painful illness. She does so with one of her father’s remedies; and being offered her choice of husband from the gentlemen at court, chooses Bertram. Snobbishly, he objects –“A poor physician’s daughter my wife!” – but forced by the King, agrees to the match. Immediately afterwards he runs away to Florence as a volunteer in the Tuscan wars – the Florentines against the Sienese – with a cowardly braggart, Parolles, as his companion.

Back at Rousillon Helena learns that Bertram will take her as his wife when she has got from his finger a prized heirloom-ring and borne him a child. She goes, in pilgrim’s dress, the Florence, where Bertram is seeking to seduce a widow’s daughter, Diana. Helena persuades Diana to yield to him but to ask for his ring and to make an assignation which she, Helena, will keep.

Meanwhile, the follow-officers of Parolles trick him into exposing his cowardice. Diana, having got Bertram’s ring, duly arranges a midnight meeting with him; hidden by darkness, Helena takes Diana’s place and gives Bertram as a keepsake a ring she had received from the King of France. Hearing that Helena is dead, Bertram returns to Rousillon, where his mother and the old Lord, Lafeu, also believe the story.

Lafeu arranges a match between his daughter and Bertram, who prepares to give to her the ring from Helena. The King recognizes it and orders Bertram’s arrest. Diana, newly arrived, accuses Bertram of seducing her; when he denies it, the King orders her to prison as well, but her mother, the widow, produces “bail”, Helena herself, who is to have Bertram’s child. “All yet seems well,” say the King comfortably, “and if it end so meet/The bitter past, more welcome is the sweet.”
-The Pocket Companion to Shakespeare’s Plays by J C Trewin


Show Information

Duration

Measure: Act One: 85 min/Act Two: 55 min ~~ All’s Well: Act One: 75 min/70 min

Show Roles

Measure for Measure
Director: Jeff Watkins

Vincentio, The Duke - Maurice Ralston*
Angelo - Matt Nitchie
Escalus - Doug Kaye*
Claudio - Paul Hester*
Lucio - Daniel Parvis
Isabella - Mary Russell
Juliet – Janine DeMichele
Mariana - Jennifer Alice Acker
Provost - Troy Willis*
Elbow - Matt Felten
Justice - Paul Hester*
Froth - Bryan Lee
Pompey, the clown - Nicholas Faircloth
Abhorson - Doug Kaye*
Barnardine - Matt Felten
Friar Thomas - Eli Jolley
Mistress Overdone - Katie Wine
Sister Francesca - Katie Wine
Two Gentlemen - Matt Felten, Bryan Lee
Officers & Attendants - Bryan Lee, Jennifer Alice Acker, Eli Jolley
Singing Boy - Bryan Lee

==============
All’s Well that Ends Well
Directed by Drew Reeves

King of France - Maurice Ralston*
Bertram, Count of Rousillon - Paul Hester*
Countess of Rousillon - Laura Cole
Lavatch - Matt Felten
Helena - Jaclyn Hofmann
Lafew - Doug Kaye*
Parolles - Matt Nitchie
An Old Widow of Florence - Erin Considine
Diana - Jennifer Alice Acker
Steward to the Countess of Rousillon - Mark Schroeder
Violenta - Kristin Storla
Mariana - Hayley Platt
Lords - Kenneth Wigley, Chris Schulz, Daniel Parvis, Mark Schroeder
Soldiers - Doug Kaye*, Maurice Ralston*, Matt Felten, Daniel Parvis, Mark Schroeder
Servants/Attendants - Kenneth Wigley, Chris Schulz, Daniel Parvis, Mark Schroeder, Hayley Platt, Kristin Storla

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.

Show Times
Shows at the New American Shakespeare Tavern begin at 7:30pm, except on Sundays, when they begin at 6:30pm

Bardometer Rating

How difficult is this Shakespearean play to grasp? On a scale of 1 to 10.
5
 
What does rating this mean?

These are plays you may have read in high school or college. The plot is fairly uncomplicated, though some of the themes may be dense or dark. These plays may include supernatural elements, straight-forward politics, historical content or religious content. (In these cases, we offer a synopsis with important historical or contextual explanations which you may read in the Playbill before the show.) In these plays, there may also be bawdy language and certain adult situations, and the language may be hard to follow for a first-timer.

We recommend this type of play to High School and College Students, casual theatre-goers, people who like mainstream films and reading “The Onion”, and Shakespeare lovers who enjoy delving into the Elizabethan world.

How to prepare for seeing this kind of play: You may wish to read the synopsis we provide (and maybe your notes from Literature Class). Or simply do a small amount of internet research. No worries – you won’t get lost.

Additional Information